Susan Boyle’s story went viral last week. USA Today had an article that listed the 10-reasons why millions around the world connected with her. I couldn’t help but compare how so many of waiters, as service providers, are guilty like those who profiled Ms. Boyle.

The reverse is also true... how many of us are the Susan Boyle of our industry that deliver extraordinary service that is unexpected, unnecessary, unwarranted, and/or undeserved (I heard this line from FOHBOH member Bob Brown).

This also applies to our internal customer: our peers, subordinates, and superiors. As teammates, we also serve eachother. And at times, are also guilty… or incredibly successful because of our perceptions, sense of personal value for others, and genuine honor of serving others.

I am especially taken by the listed reason, “It's the shame”.

Your thoughts?

Paul


It's the vindication. "When they were making fun of her, I was getting annoyed," Carrigan says. "And inside I'm thinking, 'I hope she blows them away.' I was so happy when she just let them have it."

It's the surprise. "If you have expectations of someone, you need to be prepared to be surprised by them," says Paul Potts, the chunky former cellphone salesman who was the Susan Boyle of Britain's Got Talent in 2007 and has since sold millions of records as an opera-and-standards singer. His second album, Passione, arrives in the USA May 5. "It's part of human nature to make judgments based on first impressions, but sometimes we allow ourselves to be misguided by first impressions."

It's the guilt. Why the surprise? There's no correlation between appearance and talent, says Scott Grantham, 35, a financial analyst in Atlanta. "If she didn't look the way she did, would there be the same reaction? I don't think so," he says. "We make snap judgments based on appearance, and when we see those judgments were premature, we overcompensate by going so far in the other direction."

It's the shame. Boyle forced people to recognize how often they dismiss or ignore people because of their looks. "Is Susan Boyle ugly? Or are we?" asked essayist Tanya Gold in Britain's The Guardian.

It's the psychology. "There's an emotional state called elevation, characterized by a warm, glowing feeling, that we get when someone transcends our expectations," says Lynn Johnson, a psychologist in Salt Lake City. Boyle is "an elevator — we want to believe in something higher, that there's meaning in life and that the ugly duckling can become the beautiful swan."

It's the hope. "She has truly touched my heart and soul and lifted my spirits," says Anne Jolley of San Jose, who describes herself as 47, unemployed, frumpy and "disheartened, disenfranchised, disillusioned and dis-just-about-everything-else in these bleak times." The messages of Boyle, she says, are that "there is hope still in this world; that dreams really can come true; that cynical people can be turned around; that maybe my best years are not behind me after all."

It's the distraction. With everything going on in the world, "our economy in the tank, my husband and I worried that we will lose our jobs — this was a feel-good/underdog story, and I ate it up," says Lisa Sweetnich, 40, a CPA in Massillon, Ohio.

It's empowerment. "What are we all crying about?" asked writer Letty Cottin Pogrebin, founding editor of Ms. magazine, in her Huffington Post blog. "Partly, I think it's that a woman closing in on 50 had the courage to compete with the kids — and blew them out of the water."

It's the authenticity. Unlike most of the contestants on, say, American Idol, Boyle clearly has not been groomed to be a pop star, so she is perceived as the real deal, says Ken Tucker, editor at large of Entertainment Weekly. "People want their idols to be authentic."

It's the spiritual solace. "We're responding to someone who does not have the packaging expected of us, especially women, and in that moment of recognition, people got in touch with something so soulful and spiritual," says Laurie Sue Brockway, inspiration and family editor of Beliefnet.com. "People felt blessed by that."


FOR THE COMPLETE ARTICLE GO TO:
Why Susan Boyle inspires us: A story like 'a Disney movie'
By Maria Puente, USA TODAY 4-20-09
http://www.usatoday.com/life/people/2009-04-19-susan-boyle_N.htm?poe=HFMostPopular

Views: 6

Tags: boyle, customer, food, guests, profiling, restaurant, service, susan, waiter

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Comment by Steve Paterson on April 25, 2009 at 6:29am
11th reason

Comment by Andy Swingley on April 21, 2009 at 8:15am
Great post Paul and even better response Paul G.

As I was reading this I wanted to respond that "hope" that we all can be something so much bigger than we are despite our "issues" is what keeps the soul fed.

Social Media even helps that. We automatically lend credibility to our online connections based on their words, action, and direction and not their "covers"

Non-Operator
Comment by Paul Green on April 21, 2009 at 5:50am
Thank you Paul,

We all hold hope that our contribution(s) will be recognized and valued. The triumph of Susan Boyle affirms for us that, hope, is not in vain.


In trying times, such as those we face now, evidence that hope is more than a wisp of dreams, and indeed attainable, sustains us as we try to deal with adversity.




“In all things it is better to hope than to despair”

Johann Wolfgang von Goethe

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