This is a pretty general question... when you're at a restaurant, what do you base your tip on?

- waitress/waiter?
- food?
- service?
- restaurant interior?
- restaurant class?

5%, 10%, 15%, 20% ????

Do you tip more because you are in the food service industry?

Tags: bill, pay, restaurant, tip

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I tip primarily based on service. Most food can be replaced if it's bad. During that process the attitude of the server really comes to light. I also find that if the food is awful on a consistent basis, you can bet the service isn't hot either.

Amount varies, but goes between 10% and 30%
I base my tip on a combination of factors, because even a great experience is the result of a lot of things going right. A bad one is also the result of a few things going bad.

Food, service, where I am seated, how I am acknowledged, how quickly I am greeted by a server, order taking, enthusiasm, product knowledge, ticket times, coursing, timing of courses, food plating, quality, busing, and overall quality of experience all play into my tip decision.

I generally tip 18% to 20% Occasionally, 25% for an outstanding experience and generally if the company is as as the experience. I rarely tip less than 15%. On the rare occasion where I know that it's 80% the food server's fault and the train wreck is memorable, 10%. I have never stiffed even the world's worst food server.
I usually tip 20%. If the server is terrible probably 15%. I do find myself tipping more because I am in the industry! Tip Carma!
Here in Europe, the tipping is a bit different. An optional service charge is added to the bill betwen 10 to 12.5%. witch includid as Mike said, food, waiter service, time, restaurant clean, toilet, management etc ect. the tip is an extra witch goes to the waiter for his personality involving in serving you and make sure that you have a fantastic time and food "looking after you". If the food is not good or the service is not good, then will be no service charge and no tips and peraps not even the bill at all.
In the old days it used to be a cover charge and bread and butter 10 to 12.5% charge. Tipping your personal waiter is different then tipping all the service, it is not all ways his foalt when somthing goes wrong. (especialy if he tried the best he can).
The service charge will be divided betwen the expensis for managing the service (credit card charge, telephone call for taxi, the taxetion 22% and the variety of offers to the custumers) and the staff in general. (Witch remain very little)
How does it work in America?
Of course I tip more because i'm in the industry.
I understand all about tips and never dinie that i've been there before and it was my only form income
Aa above.....I will reward handsomely when the service is great. And the converse when it's poor. As a waiter I can tell you just how great you feel when you get great tips. A poor tip gets the message across better than no tip.
I like to be clear:
I will tip the waiter for his personality involving in serving you and make sure that you have a fantastic time and good food. "looking after you".
I been waiter before and I understend the service i should provide to make a good tips or to keep the job, becouse i worked in very professional environment were terms and conditions are: no good no job. But, definitly i shouldn't provide the experience other wise we'll endup with a bunch of old grumpy waiters.
I repete, if the food is not good or the service is not good, then will be no service charge and no tips and peraps i will not pay even the bill at all.
out of this inconvenience, i will tip more becouse i'm or i been in the industry and i trust my sense of judgment for the service i recive.
I like to be clear:
I will tip the waiter for his personality involving in serving you and make sure that you have a fantastic time and good food. "looking after you".
I been waiter before and I understend the service i should provide to make a good tips or to keep the job, becouse i worked in very professional environment were terms and conditions are: no good no job. But, definitly i shouldn't provide the experience other wise we'll endup with a bunch of old grumpy waiters.
I repete, if the food is not good or the service is not good, then will be no service charge and no tips and peraps i will not pay even the bill at all.
out of this inconvenience, i will tip more becouse i'm or i been in the industry and i trust my sense of judgment for the service i recive.
I do not alter the tip based on food quality or prep because that is not under the server's control. If there is something wrong about the food I will send it back (if it is correctable). If the food is just not good, then I do not go back or recommend the restaurant
My tipping scale is: 10% for substandard service, 30% when the service is stellar. I tip based solely on waitstaff performance and it's my belief that reducing tip rates for anything out of a server's control is poor tipping practice. If I don't like the atmosphere, cleanliness, etc of an establishment, I simply won't dine there again.
I base my tip on the service I receive, and generally go 15%. I usually tip breakfast service staff higher than 15% because they serve lower cost foods, but still provide the service - so I'm more like 20 - 22% for breakfast. I tip 10% on buffets as there is much less service provided.
As a general rule I will not reduce the tip below 15% without mentioning to the server or host/hostess the reason for shorting the tip; if I don't explain the problem the server will not be able to improve for the next guest.
Hi Flicka,

re: tip 10% on buffets as there is much less service provided.

I just wanted to point out that with buffet service you are obviously forgetting that someone took the time to make the food, someone washed the plates you're eating on and cutlery you're eating with, there is a server providing beverages and plate cleanup at your table (to which they probably do tip out to the BOH staff), someone did seat you as most times a buffet restaurant is busy and therefore flow of guests needs to be controlled, as well, there are bussing staff on duty to clean up and get the table prepped for the next guest. It's unfortunate that you perceive buffet servers as providing less service when they sometimes have to work that much harder for that tip with just that sort of perception.

As for reducing the tip below 15% and then mentioning your reasoning behind this action is kind of a moot point as the damage has already been done and I'm sure that the server, let alone the hostess, wouldn't really want to hear an explanation anyway. Now, if you told the manager, then something could be done straight away. The server and/or hostess would just view you as a bad tipper who likes to justify such with a rant or explanation.

I agree wholeheartedly that an opportunity must be told to the proper people (manager's), not to the server themselves, or the hostess (most hostesses are way too busy to pass along a message to the management if it's a dinner rush...I've had messages given to me over 2 hours after the fact when I could have done something). If there was a problem with the way your food was cooked, then mention something to the server, who in turn should mention something to the manager, with a resulting visit by the manager. If there was a problem with the service, then mention it to the manager if they visit your table, don't keep it to yourself otherwise a restaurant won't be able to correct it the next time you come to dine.

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